May's New Nonfiction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Imagine : how creativity works (153.35 L) -- New York Times bestselling author Lehrer ("How We Decide") introduces readers to musicians, graphic artists, poets, and bartenders to show how they can use science to be more imaginative and make their cities, their companies, and their culture more creative.

 

 

 

The power of habit : why we do what we do in life and business (158.1 D) -- An award-winning "New York Times" business reporter takes readers to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. With penetrating intelligence and an ability to distill vast amounts of information into engrossing narratives, Duhigg brings to life a whole new understanding of human nature and its potential for transformation.

 

Unnatural selection : choosing boys over girls, and the consequences of a world full of men (304.66 H) -- Gender imbalance reaches far beyond Asia, affecting Georgia, Eastern Europe, and cities in the U.S. where there are significant immigrant populations. The world, therefore, is becoming increasingly male, and this mismatch is likely to create profound social upheaval. Historically, eras in which there have been an excess of men have produced periods of violent conflict and instability. Mara Hvistendahl has written a stunning, impeccably-researched book that does not flinch from examining not only the consequences of the misbegotten policies of sex selection but Western complicity with them.

 

Learning from the octopus : how secrets from nature can help us fight terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and disease (363.34 S) -- In Learning from the Octopus, ecologist and security expert Rafe Sagarin rethinks the seemingly intractable problem of security by drawing inspiration from a surprising source: nature. Biological organisms have been living—and thriving—on a risk-filled planet for billions of years. Remarkably, they have done it without planning, predicting, or trying to perfect their responses to complex threats. Rather, they simply adapt to solve the challenges they continually face.

 

What teachers make : in praise of the greatest job in the world (371.1 M) -- The right book at the right time: an impassioned defense of teachers and why our society needs them now more than ever.  Former middle-school teacher and teachers' advocate Taylor Mali struck a chord with his passionate response to a man at a dinner party who asked him what kind of salary teachers make.  Based on the poem that inspired a movement, "What Teachers Make" is Mali's sharp, funny, reflective, critical call to arms about the joys of teaching and why teachers are so vital to America today. It's a book that will be treasured and shared by every teacher in America-and everyone who's ever loved or learned from one.

 

Masters of the planet : the search for our human origins (599.9 T) -- This book explores how the physical traits and cognitive ability of homo sapiens distanced them from the rest of nature. Even more importantly, Masters of the Planet looks at how our early ancestors acquired these superior abilities; it shows that their strange and unprecedented mental facility is not, as most of us were taught, simply a basic competence that was refined over unimaginable eons by natural selection. Instead, it is an emergent capacity that was acquired quite recently and changed the world definitively.

 

A rich spot of earth : Thomas Jefferson's revolutionary garden at Monticello (635.0975 H) -- Were Thomas Jefferson to walk the grounds of Monticello today, he would no doubt feel fully at home in the 1,000-foot terraced vegetable garden where the very vegetables and herbs he favored are thriving. Extensively and painstakingly restored under Peter J. Hatch's brilliant direction, Jefferson's unique vegetable garden now boasts the same medley of plants he enthusiastically cultivated in the early nineteenth century. The garden is a living expression of Jefferson's genius and his distinctly American attitudes. Its impact on the culinary, garden, and landscape history of the United States continues to the present day.

 

Hello, jell-o! : 50+ inventive recipes for gelatin treats and jiggly sweets (641.86 B) -- Food blogger Victoria Belanger shares the secrets to creating inspired, modern Jell-O mold desserts--with fresh fruits and flavors, new twists on trendy treats, and artistic presentations.  Featuring modern flavors such as champagne and strawberries, key lime pie, and chai tea panna cotta, Hello, Jell-O! presents gelatin-mold desserts that are more sophisticated and fun than ever before.

 

I live in the future & here's how it works : why your world, work & brain are being creatively disrupted (658.4012 B) -- A technology guru at the forefront of Internet developments provides a layperson's explanation of how a radically changed media world is influencing human behavior, sharing recommendations for short- and long-term responses.

 

 

If walls could talk : an intimate history of the home (728.019 W) -- Why did the flushing toilet take two centuries to catch on? Why did Samuel Pepys never give his mistresses an orgasm? Why did medieval people sleep sitting up? When were the two "dirty centuries"? Why did gas lighting cause Victorian ladies to faint? Why, for centuries, did people fear fruit? All these questions will be answered in this juicy, smelly, and truly intimate history of home life.

 

Illegal procedure : a sports agent comes clean on the dirty business of college football (796.043 L) -- Former sports agent Luchs pulls back the curtain on the real economy of college football: how agents win players legally and otherwise, the staggering sums colleges make from a unpaid workforce, the shortfalls of supposed full-ride scholarships, and the myth of a college education given to scholarship jocks.

 

 

Le road trip : a traveler's journal of love and France (914.4 S) -- Part journal of the splendor of being footloose in the French countryside, part instruction manual on how to survive the pitfalls of the vagabond lifestyle, Le Road Trip is a beautiful celebration of the pleasurable perils of travel, love, and France.

 

 

What to look for in winter : a memoir in blindness (B McWILLIAM) -- In 2006 the acclaimed novelist Candia McWilliam began losing her sight, a gradual onset of blindness that seemed like an assault cruelly tailored for someone whose life consisted of reading and writing.