Featured New Nonfiction for Summer

Click here for a list of all our new nonfiction titles!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The summer of beer and whiskey : how brewers, barkeeps, rowdies, immigrants, and a wild pennant fight made baseball America's game by Edward Achorn (796.357 A) -- Chris von der Ahe knew next to nothing about baseball when he risked his life’s savings to found the franchise that would become the St. Louis Cardinals. Yet the German-born beer garden proprietor would become one of the most important—and funniest—figures in the game’s history. Edward Achorn re-creates this wondrous and hilarious world of cunning, competition, and boozing, set amidst a rapidly transforming America. It is a classic American story of people with big dreams, no shortage of chutzpah, and love for a brilliant game that they refused to let die.

Backyard foraging : 65 familiar plants you didn't know you could eat by Ellen Zachos (581.632 Z) -- Trying to eat locally? Discover food in the plant life all around you. Learn to eat your way around the block! Your backyard or a nearby park or vacant lot might be rich with edible possibilities. The author leads you through harvesting etiquette, plant identification, and tips on how to eat the leaves, flowers, nuts, seeds, roots, and mushrooms that are there for the taking. Foraging is the fun, safe, and free way to eat locally.

 

Where there's smoke : simple, sustainable, delicious grilling by Barton Seaver (641.5784 S) -- This second cookbook from Barton Seaver—following For Cod and Country—sends the rising authority on sustainable foods to the sweet, smoky grill, where he showcases his love of fresh, organic produce, fish, beef, and poultry. Emphasizing seasonal vegetables and accompaniments as much as the protein, Seaver serves up recipes designed to celebrate the spirit of togetherness—including Wood-Grilled Snap Peas with Smoky Aioli, Grilled Pacific Halibut with Pistachio Butter, Peruvian Chicken, Chimichurri Marinated Short Ribs, and Pickled Smoked Peaches. In addition to mouthwatering dishes, Seaver gives the nitty-gritty on fueling your fire; preparation and cooking; recipes for sauces, spice mixes, and marinades; and ways to eat smartly and healthily.

The drunken botanist : the plants that create the world's great drinks by Amy Stewart (581.632 S) -- Sake began with a grain of rice. Scotch emerged from barley, tequila from agave, rum from sugarcane, bourbon from corn. Thirsty yet?  In The Drunken Botanist, Amy Stewart explores the dizzying array of herbs, flowers, trees, fruits, and fungi that humans have, through ingenuity, inspiration, and sheer desperation, contrived to transform into alcohol over the centuries.

 

Cleaning house : a mom's 12-month experiment to rid her home of youth entitlement by Kay Wills Wyma (649.1 W) -- Dismayed at the attitude of entitlement that had crept into her home, Kay Wyma got some attitude of her own. Cleaning House is her account of a year-long campaign to introduce her five kids to basic life skills and the ways meaningful work can increase earned self-confidence and concern for others. With irresistible humor and refreshing insights, Kay candidly details the ups and downs of equipping her kids for such tasks as making beds, refinishing a deck chair, and working together. The changes that take place in her household will inspire you to launch your own campaign to dislodge your kids from the center of their universe.

Smile at strangers : and other lessons in the art of living fearlessly by Susan Schorn (152.46 S) -- Full of hilarious hijinks and tactical wisdom, Schorn's quest for a more satisfying life features practical—and often counterintuitive—lessons about safety and self defense. Smile at strangers, she says. Question your habits, your fears, your self-criticism: Self-criticism is easy. Self-improvement is hard. And don’t forget this essential gem: Everybody wants to have adventures. Whether they know it or not. Join the adventure in these pages, and come through it poised to have more of your own.

Yes, I could care less : how to be a language snob without being a jerk by Bill Walsh (428 W) -- There is a world out there beyond the stylebooks, beyond Strunk and White, beyond Lynne Truss and Failblogs. In his long-awaited follow-up to Lapsing Into a Comma and The Elephants of Style, while steering readers and writers on the proper road to correct usage, Walsh cautions against slavish adherence to rules, emphasizing that the correct choice often depends on the situation. He might disagree with the AP Stylebook or Merriam-Webster, but he always backs up his preferences with logic and humor.

The secret lives of baked goods : sweet stories & recipes for America's favorite desserts by Jessie Oleson Moore (641.815 M) -- Have you ever wondered where the ideas for baking red velvet cupcakes, brownies, birthday cake, Girl Scout cookies, and other dessert recipes came from? Discover the history behind America's most popular and nostalgic desserts with popular CakeSpy blogger and self-proclaimed "dessert detective" Jessie Oleson Moore. Moore has put her sweet-sleuthing skills to work uncovering the fascinating histories and tastiest recipes for America's favorite sweets, including whoopee pies, chocolate chip cookies, Baked Alaska, and New York cheesecake. From romantic musings on how desserts got their names to sugar-fueled scandals, these classic recipes and photographs are guaranteed to offer food for thought and leave you with plenty of room for dessert.

How to grow perennial vegetables by Martin Crawford (635 C) -- Perennial vegetables are a joy to grow and require a lot less time and effort than annuals. In this book Martin Crawford gives comprehensive advice on all types of perennial vegetables (edible plants that live longer than three years) including coppiced trees, aquatic plants and edible woodland species. There are many advantages to growing perennial vegetables, for example: they need less tillage than conventionally grown vegetables, so the soil structure is not distrubed in their cultivation and carbon is retailed int he soil. They extend the harvesting season, especially in early spring; they are often of more value to beneficial insects than are annual vegetables; many perennial vegetables contain higher levles of mineral nutrients than annuals.

Paleofantasy : what evolution really tells us about sex, diet, and how we live by Marlene Zuk (599.9 Z) -- Contrary to what the glossy magazines would have us believe, we do not enjoy potato chips because they crunch just like the insects our forebears snacked on. And women don’t go into shoe-shopping frenzies because their prehistoric foremothers gathered resources for their clans. As Zuk compellingly argues, such beliefs incorrectly assume that we’re stuck—finished evolving—and have been for tens of thousands of years. Our nostalgic visions of an ideal evolutionary past in which we ate, lived, and reproduced as we were “meant to” fail to recognize that we were never perfectly suited to our environment. Armed with a razor-sharp wit and brilliant, eye-opening research, Zuk takes us to the cutting edge of biology to show that evolution can work much faster than was previously realized, meaning that we are not biologically the same as our caveman ancestors.

The iPad for photographers : master the newest tool in your camera bag by Jeff Carlson (004.165 C) -- Apple’s popular iPad and iPad mini tablets are incredibly useful tools for photographers on the go. Instead of hauling a laptop, you can tuck a lightweight iPad in your camera bag and take advantage of its large screen, third-party software apps, and online access to effectively complete and share your work away from the studio.

 

 

I'll seize the day tomorrow by Jonathan Goldstein (813 G) -- Jonathan Goldstein worries. A lot. A year before his fortieth birthday, and Jonathan isn’t where he thinks he should be. With no wife, no kids, no car, and no house—not even a houseboat—what does he have? Through a series of wonderfully funny stories, Jonathan recounts the highs and lows of his last year in his thirties, weighing in on topics such as the mysterious McRib,  whether an automatic hand dryer can tell if you have a soul, and the underestimated power of a toy poodle. Filled with Jonathan’s trademark wit, I’ll Seize the Day Tomorrow is the tale of one man’s journey to find some great truth on his road to forty . . . or maybe not.

 

How to make a zombie : the real life (and death) science of reanimation and mind control by Frank Swain (398.45 S) -- The search for the means to control the bodies and minds of our fellow humans has been underway for millennia, from the sleep-inducing honeycombs that felled Pompey's army to the famous voodoo potions of Haiti. But recently, science has taken up the quest. Science punk Frank Swain digs into the reality of zombies: dog heads brought back to life without their bodies; secret agents dosing targets with zombie drugs; parasites that push their hosts to suicide or sex changes; bulls and rats commanded by remote control; city streets designed to quell violent thoughts; interrogation techniques used by the military; and viruses that take over the body and won't let go. Packed with untold stories moldering in the corners of archives and labs, How to Make a Zombie is a mind-bending, entertaining excavation of incredible science.

Double double : a dual memoir of addiction by Martha Grimes and Ken Grimes (B GRIMES) -- Now, award-winning mystery writer Martha Grimes and her son, Ken Grimes, offer two points of view on their struggles with alcoholism. In alternating chapters, they share their stories—stories of drinking, recovery, relapse, friendship, travel, work, success, and failure. For Martha, it was about drinking martinis at home, sometimes with friends, sometimes alone. For Ken, it was partying in bars and clubs. Each hit bottom. Martha spent time doing outpatient reha­bilitation, once in 1990 and again two years later. Ken began twelve-step recovery. This candid memoir describes how different both the disease and the recovery can look in two different people—even two people who are mother and son.

The shadow king : the bizarre afterlife of king Tut's mummy by Jo Marchant (932.014 M) -- The mummy’s “afterlife” is a modern story, not an ancient one. Award-winning science writer Jo Marchant traces the mummy’s story from its first brutal autopsy in 1925 to the most recent arguments over its DNA. From the glamorous treasure hunts of the 1920s to today’s high-tech scans in volatile modern Egypt, Marchant introduces us to the brilliant and sometimes flawed people who have devoted their lives to revealing the mummy’s secrets, unravels the truth behind the hyped-up TV documentaries, and explains what science can and can’t tell us about King Tutankhamun.