New Nonfiction for April

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Everyone loves a good train wreck : why we can't look away (155.93 W) -- Why can't we look away? Whether we admit it or not, we're fascinated by evil. Dark fantasies, morbid curiosities, Schadenfreude: As conventional wisdom has it, these are the symptoms of our wicked side, and we succumb to them at our own peril. But we're still compelled to look whenever we pass a grisly accident on the highway, and there's no slaking our thirst for gory entertainments like horror movies and police procedurals. What makes these spectacles so irresistible?

 

Devil in the grove : Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the dawn of a new America (305.896 K) -- Arguably the most important American lawyer of the twentieth century, Thurgood Marshall was on the verge of bringing the landmark suit Brown v. Board of Education before the U.S. Supreme Court when he became embroiled in an explosive and deadly case that threatened to change the course of the civil rights movement and cost him his life.

 

Oh my gods : a modern retelling of Greek and Roman myths (292.13 F) -- A professor of classics and visiting scholar at the Harvard Divinity school presents modern interpretations of traditional Greek and Roman myths that render classic themes accessible to a new generation of readers.

 

 

Ritual America : secret brotherhoods and their influence on American society : a visual guide (366 P) -- America's biggest secret is hidden in plain sight-the vast, fundamental and ongoing influence of fraternal orders on our culture. Just decades ago, one out of every three Americans belonged to a secret society, and more than six hundred such groups flourished throughout the country. Today they are still mighty, particularly in the military, police and government.

 

The neurotic parent's guide to college admissions : strategies for helicoptering, hot-housing & micromanaging (378.1056 R) -- Admissions rates of 6%? Kids applying to 32 colleges? Sixteen-year-olds with more impressive resumes than Fortune 500 CEOs? Has the nation lost its mind? Why yes, it has! The college admissions process now sucks approximately 1250% more time, money and psychic energy than it did when today's parents were going through the same process.  A satirical guidebook that examines, in a humorous way, the craziness of the college admissions process in 21st century America.

 

Pax ethnica : where and how diversity succeeds (323.11 M) -- Karl Meyer and Shareen Brysac undertook a two-year exploration of oases of civility, places notable for minimal violence, rising life-expectancy, high literacy, and pragmatic compromises on cultural rights. They explored the Indian state of Kerala, the Russian republic of Tatarstan, the city of Marseille in France, the city of Flensburg, Germany, and the borough of Queens, New York. Through scores of interviews, they document ways and means that have proven successful in defusing ethnic tensions. This pathbreaking book elegantly blends political history, sociology, anthropology, and journalism, to provide big ideas for peace.

 

The tattooed lady : a history (391.65 O) -- Explores tattoo origins, women's labor history, circus life and the stories of several women from the late 19th century through the early 20th century who covered their bodies with tattoos and traveled the country, performing nearly nude for all to see. Includes information on Irene Woodward, Nora Hildebrandt, Artoria Gibbons, Betty Broadbent, Jean Furella Carroll, Ethel Martin, Emma de Burgh and others. Also includes some modern performers.

 

Folks, this ain't normal : a farmer's advice for happier hens, healthier people, and a better world (394.12 S) -- Farmer Joel Salatin is the 21st century's thinking man's farmer who believes that the answer to rebuilding America is to start with the family farm and for those farms to thrive, we all need to learn how to eat naturally again. Salatin's solutions as presented in the book are very simple and easy to implement in any American household, whether in the suburbs of Chicago, the mountains of Colorado, or urban life in New York City. On topic with today's sustainable living conversation and the entire green movement in general. Americans have embraced green living and are looking for ways to nourish their families with clean, wholesome food.

 

Use your brain to change your age : secrets to look, feel, and think younger every day (612.82 A) -- A healthy brain is the key to staying vibrant and alive for a long time, and Dr. Daniel G. Amen shares ten simple steps to boost your brain to help you live longer, look younger, and dramatically decrease your risk for Alzheimer’s disease. His brain imaging work has taught him that our brains typically become less active with age and we become more vulnerable to memory problems and depression. Yet, one of the most exciting lessons he has learned is that with a little forethought and a brain-smart plan, you can slow, or even reverse, the aging process in the brain.

 

Natural companions : the garden lover's guide to plant combinations (635.9 D) -- Acclaimed garden writer Ken Druse presents recipes for perfect plant pairings using diverse species that look great together and bloom at the same time. Organized by theme within seasons, topics include color, fragrance, foliage, grasses, edible flowers and much more, all presented in photographs of gardens that show planted combinations from a wide variety of climates and conditions. Also features more than one hundred special botanical images of amazing depth and color created in collaboration with artist Ellen Hoverkamp using modern digital technology.

 

Soldier dogs : the untold story of America's canine heroes (636.7 G) -- A dog's natural intelligence, physical abilities, and pure loyalty contribute more to our military efforts than ever before. You don't have to be a dog lover to be fascinated by the idea that a dog, the cousin of that furry guy begging for scraps under your table, could be one of the heroes who helped execute the most vital and high-tech military mission of the new millennium. Now the author, an editor and featured writer for one of the world's most widely read dog blogs, tells heartwarming stories of modern soldier dogs and the amazing bonds that develop between them and their handlers. Beyond tales of training, operations, retirement, and adoption into the families of fallen soldiers, she talks to leading dog-cognition experts about why dogs like nothing more than to be on a mission with a handler they trust, no matter how deadly the IEDs they are sniffing, nor how far they must parachute or rappel from aircraft into enemy territory.

 

Chloe's kitchen : 125 easy, delicious recipes for making the food you love the vegan way (641.5636 C) -- Chef Chloe burst onto the culinary scene by winning the Food Network’s hit reality show Cupcake Wars—the first time a vegan chef captured the top prize—which delighted her many fans who had been loyally following her on chefchloe.com. The new face of vegan cooking, Chef Chloe is luring foodies of all stripes to try her ingenious, accessible recipes for delicious, vibrant, beautiful food.

 

Mad women : the other side of life on Madison Avenue in the '60s and beyond (659.1092 M) -- Mad Women is a tell-all account of life in the New York advertising world of the 1960s and 70s from Jane Maas, a female copywriter who succeeded in the primarily male environment portrayed by the hit TV show Mad Men. Wickedly funny and full of juicy inside information, Mad Women also tackles the tougher issues of the era, such as equal pay, rampant jaw-dropping sexism, and the difficult choice many women faced between motherhood and their careers.

 

Da Vinci's ghost : genius, obsession, and how Leonardo created the world in his own image (741.092 LEONARDO) -- Journalist and storyteller Toby Lester brings Vitruvian Man to life, resurrecting the ghost of an unknown Leonardo. Populated by a colorful cast of characters, including Brunelleschi of the famous Dome, "Da Vinci's Ghost" opens up a surprising window onto the artist and philosopher himself and the tumultuous intellectual and cultural transformations he bridged.

 

Lives of the novelists : a history of fiction in 294 lives (823 S) -- No previous author has attempted a book such as this: a complete history of novels written in the English language, from the genre's seventeenth-century origins to the present day. In the spirit of Dr. Johnson’s Lives of the Poets, acclaimed critic and scholar John Sutherland selects 294 writers whose works illustrate the best of every kind of fiction—from gothic, penny dreadful, and pornography to fantasy, romance, and high literature. Sutherland presents these authors in chronological order, in each case deftly combining a lively and informative biographical sketch with an opinionated assessment of the writer's work. Taken together, these novelists provide both a history of the novel and a guide to its rich variety.

 

Wild : from lost to found on the Pacific Crest Trail (B STRAYED) -- At twenty-two, Cheryl Strayed thought she had lost everything. In the wake of her mother's death, her family scattered and her own marriage was soon destroyed. Four years later, with nothing more to lose, she made the most impulsive decision of her life: to hike the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State—and to do it alone. She had no experience as a long-distance hiker, and the trail was little more than “an idea, vague and outlandish and full of promise.” But it was a promise of piecing back together a life that had come undone.